I've looked at nuns from both sides now...

Gone Girl. A writer's dream really - let's write a chapter from one point of view and then write the same events again from the other person's point of view to show how things are taken wrongly or interpreted differently. It reminds SongExpresso of that Woody Allen film (the one with the giant lobsters?) where subtitles tell us what the character really means to say. Because we are all trapped in our own language and true communication is impossible and SongExpresso is feeling Sartrean. Excuse me a moment.

Feeling better now. Where this is going is that almost all songs are written from one person's point of view and we never get to hear the other side. Notable exceptions: "Just give me a reason" (P!nk), "Don't you want me, baby" (Human League), "You're the one that I want" (half kidding).

So just recently SongExpresso was looking at Billy Joel's "Innocent Man" (remember: I know you're only protecting yourself/I know you're thinking of somebody else/Someone who hurt you/But I'm not above/Making up for the love/You've been denying you could ever feel) and got to thinking - what does the girl think about all this? Billy is showing a lot of understanding. Empathy. Patience! 

Bingo! The girl is thinking this:

"Cause I ... need time
My heart is numb, has no feeling
So while I'm still healing
Just try ... and have a little patience"

Aha! (or Take That!) - there are two sides to every story. If we can't find material here, then we're probably a pot-noodle

We can do this big or small. The smallest method is using reported speech ("you say", "he said" etc.) to bring the other person's point of view into the song. Check out SongExpresso's own lyrics from the future classic "Snakeskin":

"You say the tree to grow has to be cut
That it's normal for horses to fall
But to me it doesn't seem natural at all"

Told you it was small. The masterclass in this style would be "Cat's in the Cradle" (Harry Chapin, Ugly Kid Joe).

Next size up is a duet: "You were / I was working as a waitress in a cocktail bar". As a style, it might come over a little bit too 'storyish' for SongExpresso's taste: it's definitely telling not showing. But for nominations in this category you can't argue with "Father and Son" by Cat Stevens (I know, a duet that's not a duet). Also some powerful stuff came out of a recent Reddit "A wife kills her husband. Make me symphathize with both characters."

But being SongExpresso, we want to go for the top. So what we aim to do is the Innocent Man-Patience trick. So pick a song, any song. Pick a song you really like. Or one from a random jukebox. Best would be a song ABOUT or TO a person. Then write the other side. Simples.

See what I chose here.

In my case, bad show tunes that would never make it into any show (and certainly do not claim to stand next to Rodgers and Hammerstein) are fun to do and not hard to start (major key! melodrama! perfect cadences!). In minutes I had a couple of pages of ideas - and SongExpresso would always prefer to prune than to be scraping around for material. It's a little rough and to be a real song would need plenty of honing, but as a basis I'm quite pleased and it reflects what I think she'd say.

For anyone these should be some of the easiest lyrics to start - you have a heap of material from the original song and a character with a ready-made backstory. Aha, again! So you can answer any "allegations" or simply hold up a mirror to the original lyrics. There may be a choice to make - do you somehow refer to the original in order to ensure that your point of view has a context? Usually this shouldn't be necessary - in Maria's case we do have to understand that she is a struggling nun, but in the Billy-Gary example, the songs stand by themselves. 

So go for it. And tell SongExpresso your favorite "two points of view" songs or, even better still, your results.