Don't bore us - with your tedious chorus

Is it possible to write a chorus using just one word? Hmmm. Is is possible to write a GOOD chorus using just one word? Double Hmmm. Probably not as easy as writing a samba using just one note... 

We know repetition can be effective for creating a hook. Repetition = memorable, ey, Jude? And it can be effective at any time for cementing an idea. Yes, a couple of times. Not necessarily consecutively. But three, four, potato, more? Can we pull it off?

But let's always consider why we would want to pull it off: do we have good artistic reasons, or could it be ... (speaking very quietly) that we just don't have any better idea?

Remember, if you go this way, then you are giving up the opportunity of getting the listeners' attention with an interesting lyric. Lyrics are - naturally - one of SongExpresso's 3 pillars of fantastic. If you minimise them, then you'd better be sure that the other two pillars - Melody and Feeling - are rock solid and super-interesting.

Feeling is feeling and is a combination of various things - but definitely within the composer's power and not just a question of style, instrumentation or performance. If it feels good to you then probably it is good. All we are saying is do it consciously: Does it work in real life? Is there any alternative? Can we vary it next time? Where we don't have lyrical interest then for sure we need melodic interest, direction and variety.

Warning: unfair comparison ahead!

1. Let's start with "Sing" (Travis)

Here's the operative part:

But if you sing, sing, sing, sing, sing, sing
For the love you bring
Won't mean a thing
Unless you sing, sing, sing, sing

It's simple but definitely melodic enough to hold our interest. Each "sing" is a litle different so it doesn't really sound repetitive and still enjoys all the advantages of memorabiliy. On "thing" we are held for a while on the 2nd before satisfyingly being brought back to the root. Taking the song as a whole we have a very cute feeling and tempo, and a wide melodic range. SongExpresso one-word-lyric score: 8!

2. Moving on to "Come On" (The Hives)

We don't actually need to extract the operative part as in this one minute song the entire lyrics are:

(One! Two! One, two, one, two, three!)
Come on!
Come on!
Come on!
Come on!
Come on!
Come on!
Come on!
Come on!
Come on! (come on!)
Come on! (come on!)
Come on! (come on!)
Come on! (come on!)
Come on! (come on!)
Come on! (come on!)
Come on! (come on!)
Come on! (come on!)
Come on!
Come on!
Come on!
Come on!
Come on...
Everybody come on! (repeat from top)

It's a fun song. A rare thing, a song with more chords than words! (Though is it really a song? Or just a riff? Or a chorus? Or a chant?) In any event, the energetic feeling and building instrumental intensity are parts of the mix. The other is the variation, including the call and response. SongExpresso one-word-lyric score: a cheeky 7! 

3. Finally, what about "Inhaler" by Miles Kane?

it's a short song too, so here's the entire thing: 

I've been looking forward to lifting up the veil
Yes is the answer, you know that for sure
The night time, is the right time
Oh, don't you know girl
You've heard it before
Hey

Inhaler, inhaler
Yeah, yeah, yeah
Yeah, yeah, yeah
Inhaler, inhaler
Yeah, yeah, yeah
Yeah, yeah, yeah

Cold is the shoulder, you'll give me for sure
Dance with your hips, and grind on the floor
The night time, is the right time
Oh, don't you know girl
You've heard it before
Hey

Inhaler etc.

It's a riffy song - in fact the riff is the main entertainment. That's fine - the Feeling is good. Melody - in the verse, it matches the riff nicely and gets us moving. We really like the "lifting up the veil" lyric, suggestive and original. "Night time is the right time" is a bit of a cliche but in tune with the "up for it" theme. "Cold is the shoulder" is quite nice too. Some great lyrical potential going on here.

But for SongExpresso, when we get to the chorus it loses its way a bit. The feeling seems a bit flat; the melody lacks interest; and the lyrics seem like a missed opportunity. And the inhaler idea is actually great - it suggests breathlessness, wanting to absorb the night, drinks disappearing, as well as the potential for some other substances... It's cool - perhaps envisaged as an anthem - simple to remember and sing at festivals. But where does it really go? Couldn't we have something a bit more evocative? The above ideas could already give us a start...

Perhaps another unfair comparison - think about "Just Dance" by Lady Gaga - another nightclub song but, for SongExpresso's taste, scores higher for interesting lyrical content and for combining all three pillars.

SongExpresso one-word-lyric score: 5.5!

So what's our conclusion? There is a not altogether unfounded rumour that - in pop at least - lyrics may be dispensable. But we say "always be interesting". And the lyrics are a major opportunity for doing that. So the one word chorus is to be applied sparingly and not as a first resort. If we have looked at the alternatives and are still really taken with the idea, then the feeling, melody, variation and direction had better be good.

What are your favourite minimal lyrics? Including lalalas. Perhaps lalalas deserve their own post, what do you reckon, Jude?